AIP107 - Introduction to Politics

Unit details

Year:

2023 unit information

Enrolment modes:

Trimester 1: Burwood (Melbourne), Waurn Ponds (Geelong), Online, CBD*

Credit point(s):1
EFTSL value:0.125
Unit Chair:Trimester 1: Maria Rae
Prerequisite:

Nil

Corequisite:

Nil

Incompatible with:

Nil

Typical study commitment:

Students will on average spend 150-hours over the teaching period undertaking the teaching, learning and assessment activities for this unit.

Scheduled learning activities - campus:

1 x 1-hour class per week, 1 x 1-hour seminar per week

Scheduled learning activities - online:

1 x 1-hour class per week (recordings provided), 1 x 1-hour online seminar per week

Note:

*CBD refers to the National Indigenous Knowledges, Education, Research and Innovation (NIKERI) Institute; Community Based Delivery

Content

Introduction to Politics familiarises students with some of the main elements of politics and political analysis by examining the key components of contemporary political systems. These are state and civil society actors and institutions, the main ideas that shape them, and the way these actors, institutions and ideas manage key contemporary political issues, such as human rights, gender, race, the environment and welfare provision. The unit develops four threshold concepts that will both deepen students’ understanding of politics and provide them with the analytical tools to pursue further study in the politics and policy studies discipline. These threshold concepts are: first, that the allocation of resources in society and the values people hold are the product of the interaction between actors, institutions and ideas at different levels from the local to the global. Second, these interactions are shaped by issues of power, justice, order, conflict, legitimacy, accountability, sovereignty, governance and decision-making. Third, the understanding and practice of politics is shaped by competing political ideologies. Fourth, knowledge and truth are contested, partial and subjective and look very different from the perspective of different actors, thus leading to political contestation and conflict.

ULO These are the Learning Outcomes (ULO) for this unit. At the completion of this unit, successful students can: Deakin Graduate Learning Outcomes
ULO1

Identify and examine key political actors, institutions and ideas

GLO1: Discipline-specific knowledge and capabilities

GLO2: Communication

ULO2

Discuss key contemporary political issues

GLO1: Discipline-specific knowledge and capabilities

GLO2: Communication

ULO3

Compare how key issues are dealt with in different contemporary political systems

GLO2: Communication

GLO4: Critical thinking

ULO4

Explain key contemporary political issues from different ideological perspectives

GLO2: Communication

GLO4: Critical thinking

ULO5

Reflect on the capacity of contemporary political actors, institutions and ideas to address key political problems

GLO2: Communication

GLO4: Critical thinking

These Unit Learning Outcomes are applicable for all teaching periods throughout the year.

Assessment

Assessment Description Student output Grading and weighting
(% total mark for unit)
Indicative due week
Assessment 1 - Draft Essay Plan 500 words
or equivalent
15% Week 3
Assessment 2 - First Essay 1500 words
or equivalent
35% Week 8
Assessment 3 - Second Essay 2000 words
or equivalent
50% End of Unit Assessment period

The assessment due weeks provided may change. The Unit Chair will clarify the exact assessment requirements, including the due date, at the start of the teaching period.

Learning Resource

The texts and reading list for the unit can be found on the University Library via AIP107
Note: Select the relevant trimester reading list. Please note that a future teaching period's reading list may not be available until a month prior to the start of that teaching period so you may wish to use the relevant trimester's prior year reading list as a guide only.

Unit Fee Information

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